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Concurrent Sessions

Day 1 Sessions:

Session 1.1  | Using student information systems data to inform operations

Presenter: Richard Rush | University of Victoria

 

Most continuing education divisions have student information systems that contain vast amounts of untapped data. Through a review of multiple examples, this session will illustrate exemplar practices of how data evaluation may continuously inform and improve existing operations. Learn how the University of Victoria is extracting from registration and operational data in the student information and registration systems to inform and improve operations, resulting in enhanced operations effectiveness and strategy.

 

 

Session 1.2 |Give your programs a face-lift with simple mobile solutions

Presenter: David Asheim | CEO/CO- Founder of Engage by Cell

 

Led by David Asheim, CEO and co-founder of Engage by Cell, an industry leader in mobile engagement, hear how mobile technology can make your participantsandyourlearningand/ortrainingprogramsmoresuccessfulthrough:

 

  • Customized mobile websites that users can access on-the-go

  • Text messaging, the only mode of communication with a 98% open rate

  • Data and analytics functionality that lets you gauge the success of your learners and of the program itself.

 

Session 2.1 |Disconnect? What business wants and needs from higher ed

Presenter: Ted Cross | Western Governors University

More than ever the value of higher education is being questioned. This is happening not just in the liberal arts, but also in business education. Particularly, graduate business education and the “MBA” are being increasingly scrutinized. In response, leaders of degree and continuing

education programs must align their curriculum with industry’s needs, while filling the blind spots that emerge within society. In this way, programs

must help students make a good living and learn to live a good life. This presentation, based on empirical research of thousands of job postings will explore is there is a disconnect between what industry demand of business programs and what industry may need, but not see, from business programs. Drawing on data from EMSI, Burning Glass, as well as internal market research this presentation covers the process of discovering industry demand for specific skills, while also questioning the soft skills that may be lacking within these larger data sets.

 

Session 2.2 | Business thinking and navigating a public institution

Presenter: J. Kim McNutt | CSU Dominguez Hills Lee Maxey | CEO Mind Max

As higher education continues to struggle with the costs of implementing different delivery and business models, CE divisions have often been on the front lines of innovation.

 

In this session, we will take a look at the College of Extended & International Education (CEIE) at Cal State Dominguez Hill (CSUDH). We will offer perspective from this self-supporting college and discuss how innovation has become key in the way they broaden and provide just-in-time programming across the rest of the institution. Learn how their entrepreneurial approach has evolved them into a major strategic campus partner for CSUDH.

We will then offer first-hand insight into the most common business models CE divisions operate under. We’ll outline the advantages and challenges that come with each model and discuss how you can leverage your strengths to achieve success.

Day 2 Sessions:

Session 3.1 | Healthcare revenue cycle administration program: Developing a work-based learning program

Presenters: Floral Wong | CSU Los Angeles Hank C. Smither | Cedar-Sinai Medical Center

Nick Schultz | Pacific Gateway Workforce Innovation Network Zoraya Gudelman | CSU Los Angeles

 

During this session, Cal State LA will do a deep dive into the challenges and opportunities in developing and implementing a work-based  learning  program.  Work-based  learning  extends   into the workplace through on-the-job training, mentoring, and other supports in a continuum of  lifelong  learning  and  skill  development. Cal State LA will share its successful work-based learning program by showcasingthepartnershipswitheducation,   employers,   andworkforceboards.

 

 

 

Session 3.2 | Demystifying Microcredentials

Presenter: Amrit Ahluwalia | The EvoLLLution

 

Digital Credentials. Stackable Credentials. Badges. Alternative Credentials. There are so many types of credentials hitting the market, all of which are being sold as “the next big thing” but with little information on what they are, who wants them and what value they hold. While we’re told all these emerging forms of credentials will clarify learner outcomes, improve communication between institutions and employers, and turn the fuzzy education-work divide into a campfire where we all circle up to sing Kumbaya, the reality is that we can’t achieve this ideal vision without first clarifying the place and value of the credentials on the market.

 

The fact is that most continuing education units all already doing micro credentialing and have been leaders in this field for decades… we just haven’t been calling our certificates and industry certifications “micro- credentials”. So, the question really isn’t, “Should we offer microcredentials?” The question is really, “How can we leverage what we have already, make adjustments and clarify thinking and direction among our key stakeholders, including learners, instructors, employers and our institutions?”

Session 4.1 | Juggling full-time, part-time, and online graduate programs: How to advertise multiple programs formats without cannibalizing their success

Presenter: Jim Kelly | Carnegie Dartlet: Innovative Marketing Communications

 

In enrollment marketing, nothing is more complex than meeting the needs of the many types of prospective graduate students we work with. One way to tackle this is by offering multiple program formats that cater to the varying levels of flexibility grad students demand. The challenge, however, is advertising these programs concurrently. How do the audiences differ? What strategies work best? How can you avoid cannibalizing one program for another? In this session, we’ll explore all these questions and equip you with approaches that we’ve seen work well across the board. We’ll explore specific digital marketing tactics, review website do’s and don’ts, and provide data on what graduate students are actually searching for.

 

 

 

Session 4.2 | Positioning for growth through competency based education

Presenter: Jaimie Rush | University of La Verne

 

There are various trends in the marketplace today regarding the labor force, current and future skill requirements and changing industries and these changes represent an opportunity for institutions to capitalize on what was once a non-traditional division that is often referred to as Extended Learning, Continuing Education and/or Professional Development. Given these changes in the landscape and if done right, institutions can thrive and position themselves for growth in the new “knowledge-based economy”. One of the topics for discussion includes the fact that many jobs require individuals to stay current in their field and this will require short-term, non-credit certificate and credential programs. Has your institution adapted to this competency- based education focus? Is your institution aligning the skills needed with the programs offered based on the job market? Let’s talk more about certificate and credential programs along with short boot camps! I’d love to share the successes we’ve had at the University of La Verne and also hear from you on what’s working at your institutions and where you see the opportunities.

Session 5.1 | Upskilling and reskilling through continuing education

Presenter: Valerie Delleville | Western Governors University

 

Change is a guarantee, and a competitive workforce must plan for it and adapt. The average American can expect to change careers five to seven times in their lifetime, with approximately 30% changing jobs every twelve months (U.S. Department of Labor). Continuing education plays a significant role in upskillingandvforcareerchangesandadvancements. Whilesomecareershifts require full degrees, continuing education extends critical learning outcomes to studentswhilesavingthemtimeandmoney. Thissession willcovermultipleforms of continuing education and best practices in scalable program development.

 

 

 

Session 5.2 | Construction management certificate program - Professional training for incumbent workers

Presenter: Zoraya Gudelman | CSU Los Angeles

 

There are many moving parts to the construction management industry, with expected growth in this industry, the College of Continuing and Professional Education at Cal State LA developed a series of courses to provide training to incumbent workers. During this session, we will share opportunities in developing and implementing a professional training program using the Employment Training Panel (ETP) Program as a funding source. This type of program focuses on learning in the classroom that extends into the workplace through applying theory and training in day-to-day work, on- the-job training, mentoring, and other supports in a continuum of lifelong learning and skill development to remain competitive in this industry.

 

California State Los Angeles will share its successful training program by showcasing the partnerships with education, employers, and workforce boards, specifically the Employment Training Panel Program.

 

Session 6.1 |The waze to grow programs and revenue through partnerships

Alex Read | CSU Sacramento Melanie Mitchell | Oregon State Regina Cash | CSU Los Angeles

 

In enrollment marketing, nothing is more complex than meeting the needs of the many types of prospective graduate students we work with. One way to tackle this is by offering multiple program formats that cater to the varying levels of flexibility grad students demand. The challenge, however, is advertising these programs concurrently. How do the audiences differ? What strategies work best? How can you avoid cannibalizing one program for another? In this session, we’ll explore all these questions and equip you with approaches that we’ve seen work well across the board. We’ll explore specific digital marketing tactics, review website do’s and don’ts, and provide data on what graduate students are actually searching for.

 

 

 

Session 7.1 | Understanding the changing demographics of higher education: Strategies for enduring student success

Presenters: Dr. Sunil Ramlall | Western Governors University Dr. Ted Cross | Western Governors University

Michelle Love | Western Governors University

The demographics of learners in higher education continues to change with more non-traditional learners pursuing higher education. Changing demographics have transformed colleges from “elite” institutions, characterized by white, higher income, male populations, into schools with student bodies that are majority women and increasingly composed of minority, first-generation, and non-traditional students (Purdy, 2019).

 

For universities to be successful, academic leaders must change the way we recruit and retain an increasingly diverse student body or face declining enrollments and sustainability challenges. Non-traditional students compose the majority of the post-secondary student population, but colleges and universities across the board have been slow in adapting to serve the needs of these learners. To really be successful in ensuring student success, we must anticipate shifts in the college- aged population away from geographic and race/ethnicity subgroups that are well connected with higher education and toward those that have low post-secondary schooling attendance rates (Grawe, 2017).

Session 7.2 | Competency-Based education; Teaching with technology and date-driven decision making

Presenter: Linda Wendling | Western Governors University

Academic programs are evolving to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse set of learners who need to demonstrate industry-specific, contemporary skills and knowledge. One of the most flexible approaches is competency-based education (CBE) because it is unbounded by location and time allowing students to master relevant competencies at their own pace within their own schedules. WGU has harnessed technology to teach in new ways, focusing on measuring learning; this gave rise to our innovative curricula design and teaching model. WGU uses an algorithm to calculate knowledge acquisition into “competency units” which take the place of traditional “credit hours”. Our model also provides multiple data points on each of these competencies and measures students’ progression through their program that allows for an understanding of academic “choke points” which either require greater attention to students needs or greater attention to program design for continuous improvements in student outcomes, including on-time progress to graduation, increased pass rates, and decreased drop rates. Further, freed from classroom time, many roles of the traditional faculty model have been disaggregated to permit experts in each function (creation, instruction, and evaluation) to do what they do best and enhance student success.

Day 3 Session: DEIB Certification

Presented by Marla Parker, PhD, Assistant Professor, California State University-Los Angeles, this certification highlights the value of using a strategic planning approach to prepare, implement and evaluate DEIB training and development. Much of DEIB training and development focuses on creating courses and can have little long term, transformational success. this certification enables participants to go deeper to motivate creating a perspective of DEIB training and development that is part of the larger organizational framework, culture and mission.

 

 

OBJECTIVES: As a result of this certification, participants will be able to….

  • Create a strategic plan framework that integrates DEIB learning with broader organizational objectives, goals and actions.

  • Identify dimensions of organizational infrastructure, culture, norms and values that drive readiness for transformational DEIB training and development.

  • Engage in important self-reflection practices driving approaches and decision-making for DEIB initiatives